Thermal Analysis

Thermal Analysis is important to a wide variety of industries, including polymer, composites, pharmaceuticals, foods, petroleum, inorganic and organic chemicals. These instruments typically measure heat flow, weight lost, dimension change as a function of temperature. Properties characterized include melting, crystallization, glass transition, cross-linking, oxidation, decomposition, volatilization, coefficient of thermal expansion. and modulus. These experiments allow the user to examine end-use performance, composition, processing,stability, and molecular structure and mobility.

All TA Instruments thermal analysis instrument are manufactured to exacting standards and with the latest technology and processes for the most accurate, reliable, and reproducible data available. Multiple models are available based on needs; suitable for high sensitivity R&D as well as high throughput quality assurance. Available automation allows for maximum unattended laboratory productivity in all test environments.

As the world leader

  1. Thermo Gravimetri Analysis – TGA
  2. Differential Scanning Calorimetry – DSC
  3. Simultaneous DSC/TGA – SDT
  4. Simultaneous Thermal Analysis – STA
  5. Thermal mechanical Analysis – TMA
  6. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis – DMA

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DSC – Differential Scanning Calorimetry

INTRODUCTION

Since the introduction of the first commercial (temperature servo) device for quantitatively measuring heat flow into (or out of) a sample as it undergoes a transition, there has been considerable confusion about what name should be used to describe this analytical measurement (1). A wide variety of labels has been applied including Quantitative Differential Thermal Analysis (QDTA) (1,2,3), Dynamic Differential Calorimetry (DDC) (4), Dynamic Enthalpy Analysis (DEA) (5,6,7,8) and, of course, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) (1,9,10). DSC has been the most accepted name largely because instrument manufacturers have used the term. With the introduction of other commercial devices, which also measure differential heat flow (11,12) but are not based on the temperature servo approach (13), the confusion has increased. This confusion has been aggravated by the instrument manufacturers themselves who have often claimed unspecified advantages for their particular instrument. The manufacturer of the original commercial device, understandably, has attempted to limit the DSC definition exclusively to his design. He continues to claim that his instrument is the only “true DSC”.

We believe that DSC should be defined in terms of what is measured (i.e., heat flow) rather than how a particular type of instrument makes the measurement. In this sense we believe that DSC is generic in definition. This is the position recently adopted by the International Confederation of Thermal Analysis (40). TA Instruments, almost all of the instrument manufacturers, and the vast majority of thermal analysis users have chosen to define DSC in the generic sense. The former position, we believe, is very much like the makers of front wheel drive automobiles claiming that only front wheel drive automobiles are “true automobiles” because some of the first models operated in that fashion. In practice it makes little difference whether the vehicle is front or rear wheel driven. What is important is how it makes the trip.

We intend to show that a generic definition of DSC is the only acceptable definition. This position will be supported by equivalency of results obtained, general usage in the open literature, by comparison of temperature excursions of the sample, and by comparison to classical calorimetry.

Differential Scanning Calorimeters (DSC) measures temperatures and heat flows associated with thermal transitions in a material. Common usage includes investigation, selection, comparison and end-use performance evaluation of materials in research, quality control and production applications. Properties measured by TA Instruments’ DSC techniques include glass transitions, “cold” crystallization, phase changes, melting, crystallization, product stability, cure / cure kinetics, and oxidative stability.

TA Instruments’ latest development, Tzero™ DSC technology, is a revolutionary and fundamentally more accurate way of measuring heat flow. It provides significant improvements in baseline flatness, transition resolution and sensitivity. Tzero™ technology allows direct measurement of heat capacity, and makes Modulated® DSC experiments both faster and more accurate. Three DSC modules (Discovery DSC, Q2000, and Q20) are now available, all significantly advance the DSC technique to levels previously unattainable.

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Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Aenean commodo ligula eget dolor. Aenean massa. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Aenean commodo ligula eget dolor. Aenean massa. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Aenean commodo ligula eget dolor. Aenean massa. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Aenean commodo ligula eget dolor. Aenean massa. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus.